A tribute: 44 for 44 - Winterlude 2020 - CycleBlaze

January 22, 2021 to January 23, 2021

A tribute: 44 for 44

After two days of head-snappingly upbeat news, Friday’s headlines brought a sorrowful note: Hank Aaron, one of my childhood heroes, passed away.

My childhood began in a time that feels now like a far off, foreign place: the world before television.  In the earliest years I can remember, the family got its news and entertainment from the radio.  I don’t know if my memory is accurate or was invented over the years, but the first TV experience I can remember was watching the 1955 World Series on a black and white - my parents were both (and still are!) avid sports fans, and I have the impression that the Series was the reason for the timing of the purchase.  I wasn’t a baseball fan or player myself yet, but I think that for me it began here.  I imagine I can still remember my parents’ excitement when the Dodgers beat the Yankees.  

My parents both loathed the Yankees, for reasons I never understood.  But since they did, I did too.  And once I did start gaining a real interest in baseball a few years later, I bonded with the brilliant Milwaukee Braves.  They had everything going for them to win my loyalty: heroes like Hank Aaron, Eddie Matthews, Warren Spahn, and Lew Burdette; they had Braves as their mascot, which appealed to me because I was a boy and liked foolish things; and they were pitted against the family nemesis, those Damned Yankees.

Aaron was the greatest of them all, in my book.  In his memory, we decide to go the extra mile for today’s out and back, so our distance will match the number on his uniform.  It’s the only uniform number in any sport that has stuck in my memory for all these years.  Thanks, Hank.

Number 44 hammers out another one. My hero.
Heart 3 Comment 1
Ron SuchanekHe was great. I remember watching him hit number 715 on TV as a kid. Later, I read about all of the death threats and other horribleness inflicted upon him during that time because he was approaching Babe Ruth's record.
Reply to this comment
1 month ago

Those extra two miles yesterday really took it out of me, so I declared today a play day.  While Rachael racked up 42 for the team, I took a leisurely roll through town and along the Santa Cruz to see what I could see.  I should make a few more outings like this before we leave town, especially to hunt down more murals.   It would be a good focus for a quest.

A few days ago we saw the first real precipitation since arriving in Tucson. It didn’t amount to much, but more is on the way.
Heart 1 Comment 0
A strange tree to find here, and I don’t know what it is for sure. Odd, because several of the exotics by the Biological Sciences building have identification plates; but this one merely identifies the donor.
Heart 1 Comment 0
Unsure of the identity yourself? Here’s a hint.
Heart 1 Comment 3
Bill ShaneyfeltMight be a kapok? Trees in populated areas can be hard to figure.
Reply to this comment
1 month ago
Scott AndersonTo Bill ShaneyfeltIt’s a pink floss silk tree (Ceiba speciosa). I know because I found a tree map for the U of A campus. There’s apparently a second one just east of this one that I hadn’t noticed.
Reply to this comment
1 month ago
Bill ShaneyfeltAha! Yes, one the Ceiba (kapok) species!
Reply to this comment
1 month ago
The First United Methodist Church, adjacent to the university campus.
Heart 1 Comment 1
marilyn swettI found this picture of the Methodist Church interesting. We have one here in the historic Park Hill neighborhood of Denver that has a similar archictecture - Mission Revival.
Reply to this comment
1 month ago
A detail of the church.
Heart 2 Comment 0
The Goddess of Agave, a portrait of his girlfriend painted by Rock Marinez.
Heart 3 Comment 0
The right half of Epic Rides, by Joe Pagac.
Heart 4 Comment 0
And the left half. At 130 feet wide and 30 feet high, this giant is the largest mural in the city.
Heart 5 Comment 0
Vergiss, by Irish artist Fin DAC. You may recognize the style, because he has painted murals similar to this in cities all over the world. It caught my attention immediately because there is also one in Portland, near the east end of Tilikum Crossing.
Heart 3 Comment 0
The southern third of another huge mural, along Mountain Avenue.
Heart 2 Comment 0
At the Los Pilmitas Community Farm, a polygonic composition: septet for six quadrangles and a triangle.
Heart 3 Comment 0
At the Caterpillar Tucson Mining Center: a tetracontapentagon (45 sided polygon).
Heart 4 Comment 2
Jen GrumbyTetra-conta-penta-gon?
A word so long it makes me yawn!
With forty-five sides
One of Tucson's great prides
It's best if you view it at dawn.
Reply to this comment
1 month ago
Bill ShaneyfeltAre you a fan?
Reply to this comment
1 month ago
Back in the neighborhood, our own local cycle path: the tiny Arroyo Chico Greenway. A small loop that doesn’t really go anywhere, but it’s nice to find a few blocks of smooth surface so close to home.
Heart 4 Comment 0
Found in the Lost Barrio.
Heart 1 Comment 0
Front porch buddy.
Heart 2 Comment 3
Jen GrumbyThose ears!!
Reply to this comment
1 month ago
Suzanne GibsonHaiku:

A pooch on the porch
Asks are my ears polygons
Where are your glasses
Reply to this comment
1 month ago
Scott AndersonTo Suzanne GibsonHey, welcome to the Poetry Corner!
Reply to this comment
1 month ago

Ride stats this post: 86 miles, 2,500’; for the tour: 2,426 miles, 78,000’; for the year: 19 riding days, 874 miles, 24,000’, and 1 flat tire

Today's ride: 86 miles (138 km)
Total: 2,137 miles (3,439 km)

Rate this entry's writing Heart 8
Comment on this entry Comment 2
Jen GrumbyLove your story about Hank Aaron and the World Series as your first TV memory.
Reply to this comment
1 month ago
Bruce LellmanIn the 1950's my father (workaholic newspaper editor and owner) lugged our really large TV to his office for the duration of the World Series every year. That's how big a baseball fan he was.
Reply to this comment
1 month ago