I've Been Through The Desert on a Bike With No Name - Undaunted Porridge - CycleBlaze

July 27, 2018

I've Been Through The Desert on a Bike With No Name

The air was full of sound.

The Surlys are anxious to get out of Richland
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We left  Richland and our personal herd of sugar ants at 5:30 to try to get ahead of the heat forecast. We have a lot more desert to ride through so no dawdling this morning. 

The morning was cool but I could feel the heat trying to break through and sear my remaining brain cells. 

The morning started out serene and colorful
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Dee Forteso pretty!
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1 year ago
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Sage I think
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Bill ShaneyfeltGood call!

https://www.fs.fed.us/wildflowers/plant-of-the-week/artemisia_tridentata.shtml
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1 year ago
Ron SuchanekTo Bill ShaneyfeltThanks! Sometimes I get lucky!
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1 year ago
I was fascinated by the lone tree on top of this otherwise treeless hill
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Dee ForteI am too - very cool pic.
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1 year ago
I believe this is the spine and skull of either a humanzee or Bigfoot.
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Dee ForteHUMANZEE!!!!! HAHAHAHAHA!
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1 year ago
Bill ShaneyfeltI'd guess deer or pronghorn... and based on location, (since there is no skull to better tell) more likely pronghorn.
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1 year ago
Ron SuchanekTo Bill ShaneyfeltSo you're not completely ruling out humanzee?
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1 year ago

We had 41 pretty tough miles to ride so were careful with pacing ourselves and eating and drinking frequently. As we climbed, so did the temperature. It was manageable, but there was no shade to provide relief from the sun. Although we've ridden through stretches of desert, the last 2-3 days are have been the most desert-intensive of all. Desertsy? 

At different times I noticed  that it was silent except the sound of my pedaling, but I could hear some sort of faint, but distance harmonic noises. I can't describe them except that it was a subtle continuous humming. Maybe it was wind filtering through the sage brush, or maybe it's some new agey thing like energy from the rocks, as someone told me once. But it was clearly there.  I experienced it in Arizona last year when we were walking in the desert. So either. There is something to it or the road has taken my sanity. The line below sums it up well:

The heat was hot and the ground was dry
But the air was full of sound-
A Horse With No Name, by America

With that, enjoy this video:

I did a selfie in case I overheated and couldn't remember my name. Fortunately, in the desert you can remember your name cause there ain't no one for to give you no pain.
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Ron SuchanekTo Rachael AndersonThanks! I thought it was pertinent to the terrain over the past few days.
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1 year ago
Dee ForteLove the videos!
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1 year ago
Dee ForteTo Dee ForteThe hum is fascinating to me! I didn't know it was a thing, but it is!
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1 year ago
Ron SuchanekTo Dee ForteThanks
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1 year ago
Ron SuchanekTo Dee ForteYeah is is subtle and hard to define. I noticed it last year when we went it Arizona.
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1 year ago
Bill ShaneyfeltHad that earworm many a time riding my bike! When I first heard it in the early '70s, it put me in mind of growing up in Mojave, CA and riding my bike on desert trails.

Memories! Thanks!
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1 year ago
Ron SuchanekTo Bill ShaneyfeltThat's great. I have heard the song a billion times but riding through the desert prompted me to listen again, and then look at the lyrics. They seem to nail the desert experience well, and I'll bet they wrote the song under some chemical enhancement while sitting in the Mojave....
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1 year ago
Judy & Sharon Thieme-RahnThat was a brilliant video. The sky with no clouds portion was perfectly timed. Definitely puts that song in a whole new light. You really should name your bike though ;-)
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1 year ago

We passed the Oregon Trail National Park but it was located way up a steep incline so, as much as I wanted to see it we passed. The heat was hot. But we did get to see some of Oregon Trail ruts that are located near the road. It was cool. I've seen some of the ruts near Mount Hood and Pioneer Woman's Grave but these are more well defined. 

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J. BurgraffIncredible to think what those pioneers endured and you too, of course.
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1 year ago
Ron SuchanekTo J. BurgraffTrue. I think we had it worse. I mean, I couldn't find and IPA until two weeks ago!
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1 year ago
Judy & Sharon Thieme-RahnMuch respect to our pioneers and the Grumby's.
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1 year ago
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Bill ShaneyfeltI do like this kind of riding. It is what I grew up with!
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1 year ago
Ron SuchanekTo Bill ShaneyfeltThe desert is far more interesting than I used to think. My tolerance of heat is not as good as yours I'm sure, but I like this topography as well.
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1 year ago
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We didn't stay long at the ruts because its hot and we wanted to get to the air conditioned hotel in Baker City. Jen scoped out a nice bike path option to get us to the hotel. The Leo Adler Memorial parkway runs about 3 miles along the Powder River right through town and it's beautiful. We got to the Bridge Street Inn at around 11:30 but the room wasn't ready so we went for second breakfast next door at the Oregon Trail restaurant, which also has a hotel. Clint Eastwood, Lee Marvin slept here, probably not together, during the filming of Paint Your Wagon in 1968. I would have liked to stay where Clint stayed, but reviews indicate that the Bridge Street was better. We had a good breakfast served by a very efficient server and then checked in. The room was great. We met a TransAm cyclist from England outside.

The Leo Adler Parkway
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Dee Fortewow - beautiful!
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1 year ago
The Powder River
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Clint Eastwood slept here. But not the Grumbys.
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Ron SuchanekDo you like it better than the cowboy boot art we posted from Medora?
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1 year ago
This labyrinth is a replica of a 12th century labyrinth in France
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The Grumbys slept here
Heart 4 Comment 2
Andrea BrownIt's like the vowels are losing heart in Baker City.
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1 year ago
Ron SuchanekTo Andrea BrownHaha! Yes they are. I hope it doesn't start happening to verbs, because then I'm screwed.
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1 year ago

Later in the afternoon we walked through downtown Baker and to Safeway for dinner foods.  Tomorrow is another shortish day to Sumpter. 

Downtown Baker City
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Today's ride: 42 miles (68 km)
Total: 1,830 miles (2,945 km)

Rate this entry's writing Heart 8
Comment on this entry Comment 2
Bruce LellmanVery creative post. I loved it. And a video to boot!
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1 year ago
Ron SuchanekTo Bruce LellmanTHANKS!
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1 year ago