Valley Truckle - The seventh step - London to Edinburgh via Land's End and John o'Groats - CycleBlaze

June 3, 2019

Valley Truckle

We woke this morning to skies almost devoid of clouds and a warm sun shining.  So warm that I ate breakfast (just the usual oats porridge) clad only in T-shirt and shorts.  The forecast for today - 15 degrees and occasional showers - seemed light years away but by the time we got going the signs were there that the forecast wouldn't be far off the mark

Our route climbed from Meadow Lake up through quaintly named towns to Roche, the highest point of the day.  On the way we passed Higher Town, High Street, Foxhole and Nanpean.  Also many places starting with Pen or Tre.  I must try and find out what those two prefixes mean.

The rain started at High Street where we took shelter in a bus stop for about half an hour.  After that it rained on and off for the rest of the day but mostly off, thank goodness.

In Roche we stopped for a plate of hot chips at a fish and chip shop.  It was just the ticket to get us warmed up again after getting cold in the rain.  Then it was a long downhill and across a flattish area of farmland before we joined National Cycle Route 3.

There are parts of Cornwall that almost seem flat (relatively speaking).
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This section of National Cycle Route 3, known as the Camel Trail, follows a de-commissioned railway line alongside the Camel River and, although it climbs gently, is as flat as any section we have ridden in Cornwall so far.

A stop for a snack along National Cycle Route 3. This would be a great place to wild camp. Off the trail and with the Camel River close by.
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The last eight kilometers to Cherry Cottage Camping, our digs for the night, was back on the road and quite a stiff but rideable climb.  In fact there was very little walking of the bikes today.  Either we are getting fitter or the roads are less steep.

Today's ride: 49 km (30 miles)
Total: 601 km (373 miles)

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Jon AylingAs I'm a native West Country lad: "Pen" means settlement or town; "Tre" means (perhaps unsurprisingly) a hill. Others to watch out for are "towan" (meaning "sands"), "porth" (meaning "port") and "pol" meaning "lake". My mother lives on Penpol road, which is about as Cornish as it gets...
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5 months ago
Jean-Marc StrydomHi Jon. Thanks for the explanation. They had to be objects commonly encountered. The hills here are something else but the views more than make up for them. Now all we need to sort out are these pesky visitors from other parts of Britain that flock to Cornwall on holiday and hog the roads.
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5 months ago
Jean-Marc StrydomThat bit about Cornwall being overcrowded didn't come out right. It certainly wasn't meant to be so harsh and it would be safer to say that without so many tourists Cornwall would be a lot emptier. In particular, I was unprepared for how busy places like St Ives could be.
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5 months ago
Jon AylingAh no worries, you're quite right and St. Ives in particular can be bananas! The county gets something like 10 times its population in visitors over a summer. Things should get quieter as you move further east...
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5 months ago