I implore you, lube your bicycle chain right now! - Forty Two Miles A Day And Going Nowhere. - CycleBlaze

I implore you, lube your bicycle chain right now!

This was Jacinto’s route for the day. It had 2,000 feet of climbing in 50 miles. Jacinto said it was a good route, scenic, especially the part around Naranja Road. He added that it would be best ridden to hit Oracle Road not at rush hour.
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Art work in one of the parks.
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Tile detail.
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I like the stamped detail on this retaining wall.
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This was the only cactus I saw with fruit.
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Fruit detail.
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Bill ShaneyfeltYou can eat cows tongue prickly pears! They are quite good, but just be sure all the glochids are off! They drive you nuts trying to pull them from your mouth...
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/cacti-succulents/prickly-pear/cows-tongue-prickly-pear.htm#:~:text=Native%20to%20central%20Texas%20where,by%20Native%20Americans%20for%20centuries.
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2 months ago
Kelly IniguezLook at me learn something new! I thought they were spines - now I can impress people saying glochids. Gloh-kis - I looked up the pronunciation also!

Kelly
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2 months ago
Bill ShaneyfeltSpines are spines... glochids are the tiny ones at the base. Stealthy!

Harmless looking beavertails are the worst... They have little wart-like tufts of orangish looking glochids that look totally benign. When I was a kid and learned the hard way at 10 years old, I pulled out my microscope and looked at them. Nasty barbs!
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2 months ago
Kelly IniguezI guess I've been lucky to not have an up close and personal experience. I didn't know there were two lengths of barbs waiting to get me! I will admire them from afar.
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2 months ago
I was happy to reach the turn around at Valencia and eat my apple.
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I stopped this lady and asked about her dog. Sarah Jane (June?) has been riding in the carrier for two years and only jumped out once. She goes running to the trike when asked if she wants to go for a ride.
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I'm surprised at how many riders pass me with squeaky chains. Even the people with fancy bikes and fancy kits go past, squeak, squeak, squeak. Please! Stop right now and show your bike some love. Your pocketbook will appreciate it later when you don't need to buy that new chain because you've been taking care of this one.

I really am trying, folks. Jacinto asked me last night, after 35 years of marriage, if I really didn't know which way to turn out of the room, or if I was pretending. I really, truly get turned around that easily. All I can say in my defense is that I keep trying! 

Yesterday I got lost several times. I lean on Bertha (ridewithgps) heavily and she just wasn't on her game. Today I purposefully rode part of my route over again, hoping that I could cement it in my mind and not get lost. 

I made it past the first obstacle, Bertha wants to turn onto 1st Street instead of staying on the path. I got that. Next up was Camino de la Tierra. If you zoom in on the map at mile 6.4, you can see my confusion. I was not doing that for entertainment . . . I was lost. It's quite frustrating. Jacinto excels at traveling a place one time and even years later can remember which direction to travel. Perhaps I've spent too many years depending on his excellent sense of direction and thus I have none. None. I rode an extra two miles, happily, without Bertha warning me I was going the wrong direction. My only clue was the bike path running out so I can to consult my phone and back track to the aforementioned Camino. 

As I backtracked a man walking a dog stopped me and said a dog looked like he had been hit by a truck and had a broken leg, he didn't have a phone with him, but would like to call 911. I offered my phone. After than man placed his call and gave the information, I rode on. The dog in question was laying in the shade of a pick up truck and didn't appear to be in distress . . .  it was looking around alertly. An officer called me back shortly asking for more information, but I wasn't too helpful on the location, just the description of the truck and the dog. I was excellent on the truck, being from a dedicated Ford driving family. It was a late 70's model long bed, cab and a half, two tone, cream and white paint. There's not many of those left around.

I left by 9:30 this morning. It was chilly and overcast. I used my face mask pulled up as a face warmer. There were few people on the path as a result. I did see the lady walking her dog in the stroller. 

After my escapade getting lost on the Camino de la Tierra, I wasn't very happy with myself. I just rode that yesterday. How could I get so very lost again? Grrrr. Next up was passing under the interstate. I knew what I was doing there. Or did I? Can you believe I went the wrong direction again? I least I was prepared that I might make an error there and looked at the map and turned right around.

There's bike path construction and road construction in the area of mile 9-10 on my map. The road intersections/crossings are being improved and the mapping services aren't updated. I figured that part out with less trouble than the Camino piece.

My mood wasn't great at that point. I picked an all bike path ride today because I wanted to ride without a lot of navigation. A big piece of bicycling enjoyment for me is disconnecting my brain and letting my legs go round and round while I chill mentally. I haven't done much chilling this trip!

But my time was coming, as I headed south on Santa Cruz, there were very few intersections and more long stretches of easy riding. I saw very few riders on this path. There were a handful of homeless camps in the wash. It seemed to me there weren't as many as 2017 and definitely not as many homeless on the bike trail. Hank said he didn't like to ride the Julian Wash area because there were so many homeless he felt uncomfortable. I remember feeling that way in 2017. 

I could see parts of the path had been moved/redirected. To my memory, in 2017, I did a lot more riding along the interstate over in this area. This time, it was only a short stretch of ~1-2 miles. I just got sidetracked trying to see if I could find future plans for The Loop's extensions. But I am not familiar enough with the areas to determine just where the planned extensions are. I hope they are going to take the path past Valencia and loop around to the east. That would eliminate the need to go through the downtown area.

I rode to the exact end of the path on Valencia. I'm sure the woman I passed both directions walking thought I was nuts. I had been waiting and waiting to turn around as that's when I promised myself I could eat my apple. It's the small things in life!

Jacinto had a good looking route figured out today that went clear to Catalina. Let's see how he likes it. 

It felt as if I were going downhill after I turned around. Indeed, looking at the elevation profile, it was the most gradual of downhills. I thought it was because I got to eat my apple and felt more energetic. I was determined not to get lost on the return. I made it through one spot out of two. I still went the wrong way on the Camino de la Tierra. I went once again toward the dead end, but at least figured that out quickly this time. Do you think if I ride there again tomorrow I can do it correctly? It's so silly, I should laugh. But I can't. 

Yesterday I went past the motel to where the bike path was blocked off for construction. That gave me an extra two miles. I tried to talk myself into doing it again today. Nah - I'd get in the room and eat! That should be a priority for all cyclists at the end of a five hour ride. 

I raced through my getting to town chores to eat. I had decided on Chinese food leftovers. Which would have been a great idea except Jacinto ate my Chinese left overs, and not his. What's with that? In retaliation, I ate his Mexican food leftovers. I almost burned my mouth off from the spiciness, but I ate them. I wasn't too hungry after that, but Jacinto had been admiring my meatloaf leftovers and wasn't happy with his pasta leftovers. I knew when he gets back, he would go for mine rather than his own. So I ate the meatloaf also . . .  Those who don't know us yet are probably a little confused about all of this food stuff. Those who do know us will just laugh at the food collection we have going on. At least being stationary at night means our leftovers have been refrigerated the entire time! 

I don't know where we are eating tonight. We have two gift cards to Texas Roadhouse to use. But we want to go before 5 PM for their early dinner special and we can't seem to get ready in time . . . last night we ate at the Cheesecake Factory. My choice. I hadn't been there in at least ten years. My mother and I used to go whenever we were in Denver and we would both order meatloaf. I had to order it again in her honor. It was still delicious. 

I'm enjoying the baby's butt smooth pavement on the loop. I saw 3-4 golf cart driving park employees monitoring the path during the day today. The Loop is certainly an asset to the community and much appreciate by us snowbirds wanting some winter riding miles! 

Today I saw two short wheel base recumbents. One with under seat steering. Those are quite rare. a number of trikes - four of them together. I did not see a single Bike Friday, after having seen multiples each day. I saw a handful of tandems. In general, there weren't as many people out today. I think because of the cooler, overcast weather. It was supposed to be into the 70's, but I think only made it to the 60's. It was still a fine day compared to cold Colorado.

Jacinto had a good ride. He said that Canada Road was a good ride with a nice shoulder. Sue Schrag was correct when she said the area to the west of Oracle and north of Tangerine was good riding. He said the only part of his ride that wasn't fun was riding down Oracle on the way back at rush hour. I will post a photo of his map, just in case anyone wants to follow.

Today's ride: 49 miles (79 km)
Total: 192 miles (309 km)

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Mike AylingWhat happened to lubing your chain?
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2 months ago
Kelly IniguezAh. Got that in there now. Thanks. It was at the top of my mind until it wasn’t!
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2 months ago
Bill ShaneyfeltDirections. When I arrive someplace, I try to take note of landmarks like mountains and whatnot in the distance, associating N/S/E/W with them. That way, when I get "lost" I can just look at the landmark in the direction I want to go (or if there is none that way, look for the landmark in the opposite direction) and head that way. Works pretty well if things are laid out on a grid, or if it is in wilderness.

When we moved to Dayton, OH, I would drive downtown for something and if it was cloudy (keeping me from figuring directions using the sun), with wrong way streets that intersect at all angles and railroads with limited crossings, and no good landmarks and rivers with limited crossings that intersect, it would often take me an hour to find my way back home... It is less than 2 miles to downtown...
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2 months ago
Scott AndersonIf it’s any consolation, I missed the turn at Camino de la Terra also - the FIRST time. Twice in one day is approaching record-setting territory, and putting you in Rachael’s league. She has trouble with lefts and rights, among other navigational issues. When I’m calling out directions from behind, I’m hard pressed on whether it’s a better bet to call out the correct instruction or the opposite one.
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2 months ago
Kelly IniguezTo Scott AndersonI had an aide on the bus who couldn't do left and right. She would say 'my side or your side' . . . I followed along after awhile . . . . I'd laugh at myself if I weren't so annoyed . . .
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2 months ago
Kelly IniguezTo Bill ShaneyfeltBill,

Looking at the mountains has been my excuse for years. In Colorado, I can look at the mountains and at least have an idea of which direction to go. There are also mountains here. Maybe I'm leaning on Bertha too much, instead of looking around . . . I'm trying to decide if I need to ride that intersection AGAIN tomorrow or go for something new . . . .
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2 months ago
Bill ShaneyfeltSome people have no idea of left/right. At times on the bike path, I will wait until I am obviously going to pass on the side with the most room, riding within a few inches of the pavement edge and holler "Passing on your LEFT!" and they will step directly in front of me as I dodge into the weeds and yell "The OTHER left!" Had one do that yesterday and she yelled something back (can't half hear any more) and I yelled back that I had whistled and yelled. Too deep into the electronics... Oblivious to surroundings I guess.
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2 months ago
Kathleen ClassenI feel so grateful you write about your issues with getting lost. I also wonder about my lack of route finding ability. I have nicknamed Keith the CN for Chief Navigator and I just cheerily follow him. Sometimes I do wonder too if that is part of my problem, that I have simply depended on him for years. Keith and I live on Vancouver Island and if we want to get off the island with bicycle or car we take a huge ferry with multiple car decks. The lengths I go when traveling alone to be 100% certain I can find the car when it is time to disembark would amuse you. My best trick is to actually turn around and check the direction I need to go when returning...right or left. I never want to be one of the people wandering around in increasing desperation as the ferry pulls into the dock! The fear is real 😂.
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2 months ago
Scott AndersonTo Kathleen ClassenPerhaps surprisingly, my sense of direction used to be quite poor also. When I was younger, I took comfort in living on the west coast by the nearness of the ocean and the natural features of the lane. Keep the ocean on the right, I would remind myself when biking south. Over time though I’ve gotten much better through constant practice by staring at maps and being the CN on our team. I’m sure something is innate here, but I think too it’s a matter of paying enough attention to position and surroundings. At some point it became unconscious, and I don’t have to think about it.
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1 month ago
Kathleen ClassenI have been doing a great deal of thinking about this and have decided a good New Year’s resolution, one I might even be able to keep, is to work on my navigation skills. Of course having said that I am just home from following Keith all over town on the bikes. That is an adventure of its own, particularly when he forgets to signal.
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1 month ago