Maslow's Hierarchy of Bike Touring Needs - CycleBlaze

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Maslow's Hierarchy of Bike Touring Needs

John Pescatore

In another thread, the idea of a bike touring version of Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs came up. Yesterday I was on a very boring conference call and did some Googling.

Turns out Bicycling magazine did an article on this back in 2016 for overall bicycling that is not bad - here.

My thoughts on a touring specific version, kinda US specific and specific to me over the years (from the bottom of the period to the top):

Physiological - Bungee cord stuff to your bike and go somewhere for some number of nights.

Safety - Racks/pannier mounts, hi vis everything, rear view mirror, fenders, abandon cotton clothing

Love/belonging - buy a Trek 520 or Salsa something, Brooks saddle, follow touring forums/sites, Google how to pronounce "pannier", quietly using Strava, buying an event/route jersey, talking to touring cyclists when you are not on a bike

Esteem - buy a GoPro, radar taillight,  start posting to touring sites including miles and elevation gains, planning really long routes that you never actually do, feeling a day doesn't count if it didn't upload to Strava, wearing an event/route jersey while riding your bike

Self Actualization - not taking Strava seriously, designing and buying a custom event/route jersey and wearing it while riding your bike, being a Warm Showers host, donating that first Trek 520/Salsa something to a worthy charity to justify buying that new touring bike, creating posts to a touring site forum when you are on really boring Zoom calls.

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8 months ago
Graham SmithTo John Pescatore

John that’s an excellent and useful interpretation of Maslow’s Hierarchy.

And much more considered than my previous, tongue-in-cheek reference to Maslow where a coffee press and internet access take higher priority on tour, than either shelter or food.

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8 months ago
John PescatoreTo Graham Smith

Graham - I think these days that is called "glamping" for "glamourous camping" - which my wife says is an oxymoron!

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8 months ago
Gregory GarceauTo John Pescatore

I wasn't on a boring Zoom meeting today, but I thought about Greg's Hierarchy of Needs while riding my bike.  When I got home, I Googled Maslow's version so I could post this with some degree of smartness.  Using Maslow's outline, here is what I came up with: 

Physiological:  Pedaling, eating and sleeping outdoors

Safety:  Staying as far onto the shoulder or right lane of traffic as possible

Love & Belonging:  Keeping my promise to call my wife daily. (The love part.)  Connecting with nature by observing animal behavior. (The belonging part)

Esteem:  I feel good when I brag about my bike trip by posting an on-line journal.

Self-Actualization:  I don't really feel a need to "reach my full potential" anymore.  I'm retired.  As a bike tourist, I only feel the need to have at least as much fun on my next tour as I did on my last tour. 

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8 months ago
Graham SmithTo Gregory Garceau

Thanks Greg. I needed a format to partly plagiarise:

Physiological:  Cycling supposedly improves, or at least maintains, cardiovascular health.

Safety:  Having the bike lit up like a Christmas tree and wearing high viz. A fashion tragic.

Love & Belonging:  The joy of belonging to the worldwide tribe of cycle-tourers.

Esteem: Only a few  % 67 year olds would or could ride a loaded bicycle for six or seven hours a day. 

Self-Actualization:  Freedom, autonomy and the ability to travel long distances with minimal resources thanks to the mechanical magic of a bicycle are still wonderful things to me.

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8 months ago
John PescatoreTo Graham Smith

Nice! I love "fashion tragic."

I missed the Netflix run of "MAMIL: Middle Aged Men in Lycra" and then my wife and I tried to watch it on pay per view streaming - but seems like only Australia and New Zealand folks can do so!

If you are not familiar with MAMIL here is the description:

"During the week, they are white-collar professionals with responsible jobs, families and mortgages. Come the weekend, they transform into Lycra-clad super heroes; road warriors on expensive carbon framed bikes traveling in packs and competing with other males for dominance in the group. MAMIL is a feature length documentary that dares to enter this secret world of middle-aged men to uncover the reasons they take to the road."

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8 months ago
Graham SmithTo John Pescatore

John there’s an idea. A sequel to MAMIL.

Older Age Men In Hi Viz

I’d even wear cycling sandals and socks if I had a lead role. 

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8 months ago
John PescatoreTo Graham Smith

Apparently, the TV show "The Bachelor" is currently doing "The 70 Year Old Bachelor" or something like that. If it gets good ratings, that sequel might be in high demand!

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8 months ago
Mike AylingTo John Pescatore

Emily Sharp has set the base line.

Tent, pad, sleeping bag and Trangia and she wild camps.

She writes that she does not require a turn by turn electronic navigation device and relies on paper maps.

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7 months ago
John PescatoreTo Mike Ayling

I last wild camped (only a sleeping bag, no tent) as a 12 year old on the century out and century back two day/one night tour to Montauk Point on Long Island I've described before. It started to rain, so we moved from someone's back yard we were trespassing in (after a policeman evicted us from the beach) to under the overhang of a 7-11 convenience store next door after we saw the guy turn off the lights and drive away. 

In those ancient days, the name 7-11 came from being open from 7a-11p! The next morning, the guy (or some other guy) came to open up, found us sleeping and instead of calling the police he had pity on us and gave us the previous days stale donuts since we had no money left to buy anything...

We didn't even have water bottles or canteens and I remember him saying the company counted the cups so he couldn't let us have soda or use cups at the sink, so but he did let us slurp from the sink!

We were definitely on the lowest levels of Maslow's hierarchy but the gods seem to often look out for children and fools until they age up or wise up to higher, safer levels...

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7 months ago