Day 44 - Leedey to Woodward - Two Far 2021 - Sooo... Far - CycleBlaze

May 22, 2021

Day 44 - Leedey to Woodward

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It was another hilly day, but not too strenuous.  The tailwinds we've had for the last several days have been wonderful!

Hills ahead
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We left our very disappointing AirBNB before 9:00.  I thought I had learned to make good judgements on AirBNB listings, but this one really fooled me.  The worst thing was NO HOT WATER after Kerry took his shower this morning.  That is not a good way to start the day.

The day got better at our first stop in the little town of Camargo.  The owner of the local deli made us a good breakfast and we had interesting conversations with several other customers.  Without exception, every other customer who came in while we were there was known to the employees and to each other.   A few of the men who came in talked about haying they were planning to get done.  We saw some in process a later in the morning.

A field full of hay bales
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Hay cut and dried and ready to roll. I would have said "bale", but the guys this morning talked about "rolling'" hay.
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Some more cows cooling their feet.

I assume that they go in here to drink.
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Vici was the larger of the towns we visited today.  We were told it is pronounced "vie-sigh".  That's not at all what I would have guessed. Vici had a small shopping district and a large elevator.

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The old VIci depot and a caboose
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A closer look at the caboose
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The Farmer's Co-op Elevator, Vici, OK
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After Vici, there were no stops until we got to Woodward.  We rode through more beautiful Oklahoma land.

The red soil in Oklahoma is not clay, but silt loam. Specifically, it is called "Port Silt Loam" after the town of Port in Washita County. The red color comes from it's iron oxide content. It is the official soil of Oklahoma.
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We also crossed the Canadian River.  Kerry said it is well known to readers of Western novels.

The Canadian River
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A few miles from Woodward, we started seeing this wildflower along the road.  It is really pretty with it's vivid yellow blossoms.  I tried to get enough detail in the pictures for our expert readers.  Can you help, Bill?

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Bill ShaneyfeltGreat evening primrose pictures! There are about a dozen or so species in that area according to one website...

My guess is this might be Missouri evening primrose.

http://www.missouriplants.com/Oenothera_macrocarpa_page.html
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2 months ago
Jeanna & Kerry SmithTo Bill ShaneyfeltThank you, Bill. Evening primrose is a very familiar name, but I didn't know what it looked like. I appreciate the time you take to help us learn.
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2 months ago
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Rose SamsonThe yellow flowers are beautiful! I wish these flowers grow in Florida Highways! It would be a nice sight!
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2 months ago
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In Woodward, we visited the Plains Indian & Pioneers Museum.  The Plains Indians exhibit is small and clearly an addition to the museum.  We found that it was previously the "Pioneers Museum".  I learned something new today at this museum.  American history as taught to teenagers in the south in the late 60's is quite different from things I am learning now.

I knew that Native Americans used every possible part of the bison. (As Kerry's grandmother said about the pigs they butchered when she was a child, "We used everything but the squeal.")
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I did not know that the US government "sanctioned and actively endorsed the wholesale slaughter of bison herds" for the purpose of pressuring Native Americans onto reservations by destroying their primary source of food.  I was taught that the bison disappeared from over hunting and white settlement, but never that it was an intentional  act of aggression against Native Americans.

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Ken GassYes, they shot buffalo from the trains, among other ways. Slaughtered over a million in the process, all wasted. After the Civil War there were not enough white enlistees to man the western forts along the wagon and train routes to guard against Indians raiding their "stolen lands". Black soldiers were recruited and called the "Buffalo Soldiers." You may remember Bob Marley's song about them . Listen to the lyrics sometime!
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2 months ago
Jeanna & Kerry SmithTo Ken GassI'll do that. Thanks for the further information.
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The remainder of the museum had the usual displays of pioneer life in the early 20th century.  Outside a facade representing a family farm home from the 1940's-1950's was this implement.  Neither Kerry nor I have any idea what it might be.  Can any of our readers enlighten us?

What is this thing? Kerry here... I cheated and Googled this, so now Jeanna & I know what it is. Answer is at bottom of today's post.
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Jacques CharronThis machine separate cream from milk. We had one at the farm int the 60’s
It’s taking a lot of maintenance....We had to clean every parts of it daily after each used....
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2 months ago
Mike ObermeyerMy wife says, yes it's cream separator. She says it's missing some parts.
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2 months ago
Jeanna & Kerry SmithTo Jacques CharronI had no idea what it was until Kerry looked it up. Farm life is a lot of work!
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2 months ago
Looking into the basin on the top
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The plate on the front
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Tomorrow we have a 34 mile route - a day to sleep late and pedal slowly!

And the answer is:  A DeLaval cream separator.  Gustaf de Laval patented his first cream separator in 1887 and the Swedish based company is still in business.

Today's ride: 46 miles (74 km)
Total: 1,890 miles (3,042 km)

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Comment on this entry Comment 4
Mike ObermeyerBe safe and stay dry.
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2 months ago
Jeanna & Kerry SmithTo Mike ObermeyerI almost hate to say it, but we have been so lucky with the weather so far. We've hardly gotten wet at all since the early days of our trip.
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2 months ago
Bob & Jan ThompsonNoticed that milk/cream separator right off. Had one in our dairy when I was a youngster. My job was to turn the crank. Also, we were the first in our area to get the DeLaval auto milkers. No more hand squeezing.
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1 month ago
Jeanna & Kerry SmithTo Bob & Jan ThompsonWe've heard from some others who used these as kids. Sounds like a lot of work! The auto milkers must have been a huge help.
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1 month ago