To Pontevedra: a photo addendum - Vuelta a Iberia - CycleBlaze

September 22, 2019

To Pontevedra: a photo addendum

This is an abbreviated entry for the day, mostly consisting of photos I couldn’t upload earlier.  Refer to the earlier entry In Baiona: an interim report for a narrative overview and the map.  

It’s also a pretty perfunctory entry.  I picked up a bad cold yesterday, and don’t feel the most inspired.  Blah.

One thing that has greatly impressed me about this region is how widely granite is used as a primary construction material.  It is employed for just about everything:

To build hórreos
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And grape trellises
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And fountains
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And bicycle stands.
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It’s a windy day today and long, sandy Lanzada Beach is bustling with surfers.
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South of Lanzada Beach is this small peninsula, with the ruins of a castle and modest hermitage.
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The hermitage at Lanzada
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Looking north toward Lanzada Beach
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Looking back toward the hermitage before continuing south.
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Today’s ride included a small spur down this road, the route we had mapped for the final miles into Pontevedra.

It probably would have helped here to be able to read Gallegos, or at least Spanish. It looks though like one of those situations where bikes can get through when others can’t, so we took a chance.
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Not today.
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The estuary south of Pontevedra. In the foreground to the right are the two slimed dories that we’re photographed in close-up in the earlier post.
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Our favorite memory from Pontevedra is our walk along the riverside.  Both banks are fine for walking, and all of the bridges we passed or crossed over are worth a second look.  If we lived here, it’s a walk we would take often.

Eastbound on the south bank of the Lerez, approaching the Ferreira Bridge
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The pedestrian Ferreira Bridge
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The Tirantes Bridge
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The medieval Burgo Bridge dates to the XIX century. This is the bridge that the Camino crosses.
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Recrossing the bridge we biked into town over.
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Rachael’s fish dish this evening looks amazing, doesn’t it? I’ll have to check her notes to get the details.
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Andrea BrownI call this dish "Fish in Hiding".
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2 months ago
Bruce LellmanI call it, "The one that got away."
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2 months ago
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