Creative baggage ideas? (page 2) - CycleBlaze

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Creative baggage ideas? (page 2)

John SaxbyTo Robert Ewing

Nice work, Robert!

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3 weeks ago
Karen CookTo Robyn Richards

Hi,

If I am only going one way I will buy a crappy suitcase at a second hand shop or garage sale for less than $5 and leave it behind at my destination.  In fact I pick up bargains (or free ones) and have a small stash of "throwaway suitcases" of different sizes in my garage.  Once I gave one to a train conductor at my destination.  He was happy to have it for a kid he was sending to college.

I am not sure if this is what you mean....but when I have flown with my bike in a box to Europe, and didn't want to pay for an extra checked bag, I stuffed 1 rear and 2 front panniers, plus lighter things (such as the sleeping bag) in with the bike as "padding".  Then fill the second rear pannier to the brim as a carry on, focusing on heavy stuff that is legal through security, while wearing as many clothes, jackets, etc as possible and practical.  It always seems like the bike is just at the weight limit and the carry on pannier just manageable to enough carry from curb to gate.  So far the airlines I have taken to Europe don't charge for a bike, or the bike counts as the one free piece of luggage.

Karen

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2 weeks ago
Robyn RichardsTo Karen Cook

Hi Karen. Love your innovative approach! In the past we've had to load up panniers and stash bike boxes as you do. But now, with our bikes wintering over in Europe, all we need take is clothing. Which is a piece of cake in comparison to what you do!

I think I will investigate the cheap stripey plastic bag option. That way, it can be folded up and stuffed in pannier when I'm cycling, then brought out for trip home.

Thanks for your input.

Cheers

Robyn

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2 weeks ago
Graham SmithTo Robyn Richards

Robyn another option are lightweight, compressible tote bags. Kathmandu sell various sizes. Or the GroundEffect bike bags are also excellent. They are light enough and squashable enough to pack in your pannier, or even put in an envelope and post ahead or home. They are sturdy  enough to check in as luggage. When I travel to NZ I put all my packed panniers into one tote bag. My padded, folded bike fits into another. On arrival in NZ I then post the tote bags ahead to my in-laws place. Sometimes I keep one tote bag with me on tour and use it as a ground sheet under my tent.

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2 weeks ago
Robyn RichardsTo Graham Smith

Sounds a more robust option than the stripey bags. Will check this out, thanks.

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2 weeks ago
Graham SmithTo Robyn Richards

The yellow one in the pic is the Kathmandu version of a tote bag.

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2 weeks ago
Robyn RichardsTo Graham Smith

Nice!

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2 weeks ago
Graham SmithTo Robyn Richards

They come in blue too:)

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2 weeks ago
Robyn RichardsTo Graham Smith

Am using airport downtime for Karhmandu research!

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2 weeks ago
Graham SmithTo Robyn Richards

‘Tote bag’ search might reveal other brands too. I just mentioned Kathmandu as I recall they have many outlets in NZ. MacPac might also have an equivalent. The tote bags with a clip on, clip off shoulder strap are best. The strap can be removed and packed into the bag at check in. This reduces the chances of the strap tangling  other luggage on the conveyor belt at the airport. 

Another handy feature of tote bags is they can usually tuck into themselves when they are empty.  They can go from big to very small in a few seconds. 

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2 weeks ago