Day 65 - In Gering - Two Far 2021 - Sooo... Far - CycleBlaze

June 12, 2021

Day 65 - In Gering

Today was a rest day in Gering.  Last night we took a short stroll into the historic downtown.  It was a nice area with some interesting old buildings.

Kerry said he was going to visit here this morning, but he didn't make it.
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These colorful shrubs were planted along the road. Is this heather??
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Bill ShaneyfeltFlowers are wrong shape for heather. Could not find a good image match either.
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1 month ago

We spent the morning at the Legacy of the Plains Museum.  We've visited several museums of the plains and westward trails.  This one was the best.  It told the story of this area from fur traders in the early 1800's through farmers into the the 20th century.  The exhibits were very well done.  I'm posting a few things for you to enjoy.

This is a "bull boat" made from animal hide over a wooden frame. They were good for the flat, shallow North Platte River and used by Native Americans and fur traders.
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Rose SamsonThis is interesting! These animal hide can also be made into coats and good for Winter.
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1 month ago
Photo of a bull boat
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Mike ObermeyerThanks for sharing the bull boats. I don't think I have ever seen one before.
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1 month ago

Two loaded wagons, without their covers.

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Items like the spinning wheel were often discarded on the trail or used for firewood.
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Mike ObermeyerI recognized the two survey instruments on the left side of photo.
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1 month ago
An accurate depiction of a family following, not riding in, their wagon.
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Rose SamsonThis wagon I saw in the movies. Those kids must be very tired
when they get home or where they are heading to.
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1 month ago
Suggested supply list for starting out.
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I thought the qualifications for Pony Express riders were interesting.
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Rose SamsonThis ad is kind of scary. L.O.L.
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1 month ago

The largest part of the museum was dedicated to local life and farming from the late 1800's through the 1950's.

We all know what this is now, but I see them in every museum and can't resist!
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When I was a little girl, my grandparents had a chicken house that looked very much like this inside.  I was very afraid to reach under those hens to get eggs!

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Jacques CharronYes we had lots of those!
Sometimes hens could bite your hand if you try to get their eggs under
Good old days!
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1 month ago

Jacques and Pierre, this made me think of you.

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Perhaps you, or my other farm raised readers, can help identify this machine.  It was in the poultry section, but I couldn't find anything which told what is was.

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Bob & Jan ThompsonKerry...the projections out of the drum should be made of rubber or are the metal tubes which lengths of rubber hose are attached. The driven pulley on the right offers power to rotate the drum. As it is turning, you hold and rotate a chicken against the metal rails...and in turn, plucks the feathers from the chicken. I have seen small versions of this type machine used to pluck chickens. In this case I could be mistaken.
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1 month ago
Jeanna & Kerry SmithTo Bob & Jan ThompsonThanks, Bob. We had no idea about this one.
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1 month ago
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Jacques CharronHi Jeanna and Kerry,
Yep I remember…..This machine was used to remove feathers from the chickens
Afer they had their heads chopped off… Chickens were soaked in boiling water for 30 -40 seconds and the the rubber spikes rolling around were removing the feathers on their skin…
Sorry it’s a bit disgusting!
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1 month ago
Jeanna & Kerry SmithTo Jacques CharronI think it doesn't hurt to remember that our meat doesn't start out in a nice, clean plastic wrapped package "ready to cook" from the store. It was all part of a live animal before we got it home.
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1 month ago

Ken, from Monte, this is for you.  It looks like a forerunner of the thing you identified for us last week.

Beet loader. Sugar beets have been a major crop in the Nebraska panhandle.
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Center pivot irrigation is responsible for a big increase in crop  productivity - and for crop circles.   We have noticed the Valley Sprinkler brand everywhere.  

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This is a section of the pivot sprinkler
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I love learning the derivation of words and expressions.  Kerry knew why a non-conformist was called a maverick, but I didn't.

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Having done only a small amount of horseback riding, I feel sure that plastic saddles are better for TV cowhands than real ones!

Even Roy Rogers couldn't sell these!
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A plastic saddle
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When the snow flies and you still have to get around, what do you need?

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Turn your car into a sled with the Snow Bird conversion kit.
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Last museum picture - shrinking technology.  It shows what is used to take do to what your cellphone can do today.

This is a cool display, but I take exception to the violin. Playing an instrument is an art for which a cellphone is no substitute.
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When we finished seeing the museum, we rode up to the Scotts Bluff National Monument.  We walked around the Visitors Center, but decided not to make the steep walk up to the summit.  It was 90+ degrees and not the best day for a hike.  

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Today's ride: 5 miles (8 km)
Total: 2,517 miles (4,051 km)

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Kenneth KoehnHi Jeanna, Ken here again. In reference to the machine with the rubber fingers, I believe that is a device used to de-feather chickens on butchering day. They would scald the chickens so the feathers could be removed more easily. The conveyor simply looks like what they would use to elevate the beets from the ground to the truck. Keep up the nice reporting!
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1 month ago
Jeanna & Kerry SmithTo Kenneth KoehnThanks for the information, Ken. We had someone else who knew about the de=feathering machine. We never would have figures that one out.
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1 month ago