Day 21: Malaga to Cordoba: PART 2 - Grampies Go Valencia to Paris: Spring 2024 - CycleBlaze

February 27, 2024

Day 21: Malaga to Cordoba: PART 2

Here is Part 2 of our transfer from Malaga to Cordoba. Read Part 1 first, to have the whole story.

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After a brief run though the usual unattractive modern roads of Cordoba beyond the old core, we entered a warren of narrow one way streets that took us to the hotel Dodie had found, just beyond the Jewish quarter and in walking distance to the Mosque/Cathedral, Roman Bridge, and the other stuff that had brought us here.

Our van ride stopped about here, after manoeuvering around a bit to get down the narrow one way street.
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The trip had taken about double the expected time, and we felt badly for the taxi lady, who got trapped on the road trying to get us to Cordoba. The farmers, feeling some economic pain, had lobbed a hunk of it at our driver. We thought, if there is going to be pain flying around, then to be fair we should share in it. So Dodie passed the lady a whack more money than had originally been agreed.

Then, in a move so different from what we had experienced at the hotel in Malaga, the lady from our Casa de los Azulejas came out to the street, to usher us and our sorry pile of disassembled bikes inside. She was also speaking to us in French, which was a help.

In the lobby, I put the bikes back together, and the lady said just stash them here, and soon I will put them in a storage room. OK! She also asked if we didn't mind if she spoke to us in English, since her French was not all that strong. OK!

Casa de los Azulejas (House of Tiles) is well named, and it is drop dead gorgeous. Have a look:

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Since our bags were already off the bikes, we very quickly went to our room, and then were ready to nip put for a peek at the old city.

The street we were on was not only narrow and cobbled, but it was lined with orange trees. Dodie had to work to keep me from climbing for an orange, explaining that they would be the bitter marmalade variety.  Yeah, maybe!

Narrow cobbled street.
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Trees like this line many streets.
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Bill ShaneyfeltWith that lumpy, wrinkly looking skin, she's probably right... When I was a new student at ASU in Tempe, those things kept me alive for about a week while I had no money... Sour like a lemon! We juiced some and called it "go juice" because if you were drowsy and took a swig, you were instantly ready to go...
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1 month ago
Steve Miller/GrampiesTo Bill ShaneyfeltDodie here. I can always recognize Seville oranges because they were available for only a month or so in January at home. I would buy a large quantity and make marmalade. It is the traditional English bitter orange marmalade, yummy.
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1 month ago

We also found that it was not only our hotel that had the beautiful tiles. Looking into the vestibules of apartment buildings, we saw tiled beauty there as well:

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We passed a Carrefour Express grocery, which saved us from having to choose a restaurant. We also learned that it would be open tomorrow. This despite the fact that tomorrow is Andalucia Day, a general holiday. We spoke to the grocery clerk about this, learning that though many stores  would be closed, his grocery would be open. We then conveyed this information, as the (laughable) Spanish experts on the sidewalk, to other English speakers there who needed this critical info.

Our walk then took us to several of the main attractions of old Cordoba - the Roman Bridge, with its large and now separate Gate,  the Triumph of San Raphael statue,  and the amazingly huge Mezquita Mosque/Cathedral. We just breezed past these things, knowing that tomorrow we would be back to visit them and others.

The Roman Bridge - east side.
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The Roman Bridge, west side. See how the aquadynamic supports are shaped to receive the river current, that comes from the east.
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The Roman Gate of the Roman Bridge. This existed at the time of Julius Caesar, and has a history (and names) that extend through the time of the Moors and then the Reconquista.
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Must be some Roman guys, at the top.
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There is a story behind this statue - we'll delve in to it tomorrow.
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Arc angel Raphael, at the top
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The Moorish influence is very evident here. Dodie really liked these buildings.
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The mosque is really a block long - it defines the block.
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Intricate designs on the sides of the building, but we think it will be more glorious inside.
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Another girl and myself were trying to take this shot, but two gormless tourists were just loitering in it. I sent Dodie in to bulldoze them out, causing Dodie and the grateful girl to bond instantly.
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The Cathedral is found at one end of the mosque. The development of the whole huge area (since 785 A.D.) (as large as St. Peter's in Rome) is something we will learn about. I think the Cathedral tower used to be the mosque bell tower, for example.
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We continued our walk past souvenir shops beside the mosque. We actually love such shops.

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Here are mosque oriented - plaques? to hang up.
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And much multi-coloured pottery.
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Really much. Sadly none can come with us on the bikes!
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Andrea BrownI have a very pitcher very similar to the ones on the right that I bought in Granada in 1998. It's one of my treasured possessions. But it's true, it's a good thing we travel by bikes or the house would be stuffed with such things.
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1 month ago
We are still walking, beside the mosque and toward the river.
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I photographed what looked like the only Moor left in the city by Ferdinand and Isabella. Despite his traditional appearance, he, like everyone else on the planet is checking his iPhone.
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Today's ride: 6 km (4 miles)
Total: 907 km (563 miles)

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