In Agde (a photo gallery) - Three Seasons Around France: Autumn - CycleBlaze

October 30, 2022

In Agde (a photo gallery)

It doesn’t take that long to polish off the meager breakfast we’re presented with at Hotel Adair, perhaps the most spartan petit dejeuner we’ve sat down to this autumn.  Some will find this unfathomable, but it does make us long for the Full English treatment, sans the beans and black pudding.

With another short, relaxed ride ahead (we’re really getting into the rhythm of these - when needs all those hills, anyway?), there’s time for me to dash across the river to meander through Agde’s historical center before it’s time to start packing up.

Agde is a distinctive town, not really quite like any other I know of.  It’s one of the oldest cities in France, preceded only by Beziers and Marseille. it was founded by the Greeks in 525 BC, its name evolved from the original Agathe Tyche, Greek for good fortune.  What really distinguishes it for me though is that so much of its core, including its landmark 12th century Saint Stephen Cathedral, is built of black basalt from the remains of an ancient volcano the town is built upon.

It’s a pretty undisciplined collection, heavy on basalt-framed windows and doors and Sunday morning wash; but then I’m pretty undisciplined so perhaps that’s to be expected.

Saint Stephan cathedral. Romanesque, but not with a look like any other Romanesque structure I’m aware of.
Heart 2 Comment 0
Saint Stephan cathedral.
Heart 1 Comment 1
Keith AdamsDark basalt is such a contrast to the light-colored limestone used in so many places. Gives the place a bit of a brooding character even on a sunny day.
Reply to this comment
4 weeks ago
Saint Stephan cathedral.
Heart 2 Comment 0
Saint Stephan cathedral. Interesting to see basalt used as a sculpture medium.
Heart 3 Comment 0
The interior of the cathedral has a gloomy look.
Heart 1 Comment 0
The windows are especially striking, with their stark black frames. Wandering through town is like a stroll through an art gallery.
Heart 5 Comment 1
Keith AdamsIf only you had thought to photograph other windows, for easy comparison and contrast.
Reply to this comment
4 weeks ago
Heart 0 Comment 0
Basalt water fountain.
Heart 0 Comment 0
Sunday wash day.
Heart 4 Comment 0
Heart 3 Comment 1
Keith AdamsThat stonework looks almost like cinder block. Technically, I suppose basalt and basaltic volcanic ash practically *are* cinder block, aren't they?
Reply to this comment
4 weeks ago
Heart 4 Comment 1
The House of the Consuls. Built in 1651 in the Italian Renaissance style.
Heart 2 Comment 0
Lion, House of the Consuls.
Heart 2 Comment 0
Heart 4 Comment 0
Heart 0 Comment 0
Heart 3 Comment 0
L'image obligatoire.
Heart 3 Comment 0
Heart 4 Comment 0
Heart 3 Comment 0
Heart 2 Comment 0
I was curious about the story here, but not enough so to wait and see what came next.
Heart 3 Comment 0
Heart 1 Comment 0
Rue du 4 Septembre radiates off the Place de la République.
Heart 6 Comment 0
Shielding from the pigeons apparently.
Heart 0 Comment 0
Heart 0 Comment 0
The fountain, Place de la République.
Heart 1 Comment 0
Heart 3 Comment 0
Heart 3 Comment 0
Heart 1 Comment 1
Keith AdamsThe dark gray stone, coupled with the tiny window near the door and the window bars above, give that place a brooding, vaguely menacing fortress-like look.
Reply to this comment
4 weeks ago
Heart 1 Comment 0
Heart 1 Comment 0
Heart 1 Comment 0
Rate this entry's writing Heart 10
Comment on this entry Comment 2
Graham FinchYou saw some very nice windows there.
I knew you'd miss the Full English sooner or later.
Reply to this comment
4 weeks ago
Scott AndersonTo Graham FinchSadly no interesting chairs or traffic cones, but probably too much to hope for. If I come across a basalt traffic cone you’ll be the first to know.
Reply to this comment
4 weeks ago