When is a tire trash? (page 2) - CycleBlaze

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When is a tire trash? (page 2)

Mike AylingTo Leo Woodland

Hi Leo

I refuse to call a lavatory a rest room or bath room however,

I try to avoid air travel because it is so uncomfortable but on a recent trip to New Zealand the no smoking announcement made particular reference to " the lavatories".

Mean while here DownUnda  the electronic media reporters seem to think that we are now the 51st State and continually refer to "bathrooms"

I favour the good old Aussie term of Dunny!

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11 months ago
Leo WoodlandTo Wayne Estes

Goodness... I didn't know you were a Fallen European. Might there be charities caring for such people, do you think?

I fear that I have never heard of "bill of fare", certainly never seen it in use. "Menu", however, is an everyday word. Where we differ from Americans, especially here in France, is that the entrée is what it says it is - the first part of the meal, the entry - and not the main dish

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11 months ago
Leo WoodlandTo Mike Ayling

Dunny, you'll be delighted to hear, was originally a rural road, or part of one, in which the good folk of the village emptied their lavatories.

There are still many Dunny Lanes in Britain, although the original meaning is lost. The name comes from the colour that the fields beside the road acquired.

It makes an admirable Aussie word, though, doesn't it, with the Down Under habit of adding a -y to end of words to form a diminutive.

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11 months ago
Mike AylingTo Leo Woodland

Thank you Leo.

I had no idea about the derivation of the word.

Mike

 

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11 months ago
Kathleen JonesTo Leo Woodland

I never tyre of Britishisms. End that’s the and of that.

I change tires when I start getting more flats. My mileage may wake me up to the fact that the tread needs looking at, but it’s not my main criteria.

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11 months ago
Leo WoodlandTo Kathleen Jones

I never tyre of Britishisms. End that’s the and of that.

Lovely. Thanks for the smile

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11 months ago
Keith AdamsTo Kelly Iniguez

My bike tires have to go when they become flat-prone, or when the sidewall or valleys in the tread begin to show "significant" deterioration and cracking due to dry rot.  20+ years ago my then-preferred brand and model of tire had a design where the outermost layer tended to break away in thin flakes.  I never seriously doubted the integrity of the tire casing but that habit caused me to junk a few after a while and to switch to another brand or model.

Bead failure is a good reason to discard a tire before the tread is worn through.
So is internal casing damage, caused (probably) by a heavy blow on the sharp edge of a pothole that went unseen until the very last second while I was traveling at some speed. This was the rear tire on a bike carrying me and probably 35-40 pounds of gear over the back end of the bike.
The bulge was an obvious hint that the tire's internals were compromised. It caused a very discernable "ka-thumpa ka-thumpa ka-thumpa" in the ride quality.
The visible deflection in the line of the tread was another clue that this tire was ready for the scrap heap..

I once hit a screw with a brand-new Gatorskin; the dratted screw damaged the reinforcing wires in the tire casing badly enough that they continually abraded fresh holes in the tube.  At the end of a frustrating day with multiple flats, that new tire went in the trash.

Cuts, if deep and large enough, will also do in a tire.  

This looked bad but wasn't the immediate cause of my decision to trash this tire.
This smaller, more innocuous-looking perforation was enough, though.
Here's the inner side of the tire; the red circle outlines the spot corresponding to that smaller cut. The cotton is snagged on what I think was the end of a wire from the inner structure of the tire; whatever cut the tread also cut the wire and pushed that end into contact with the tube, where it proceeded to create a succession of pinholes. The tire had to go.
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11 months ago
Keith AdamsTo Kelly Iniguez

"Jacinto purchased a new Rodriguez Bicycle. They stock their bikes with Panaracer tires..."

Not always, apparently.  It may depend on the model you choose, or your weight, or what you tell them about how you plan to use the bike, or what size (diameter and width) tire you plan to run.  Or it may be evolution in market forces and pricing or availability / supply chain.

My Rodriguez, purchased late in 2022 and therefore possibly affected by supply chain and availability issues, came equipped with CST Sensamo Master tires- a brand with which I am otherwise unfamiliar.  

Rodriguez Phinney Ridge, equipped with CST Sensamo Master tires. They're nice and chunky (700x35), give a decent ride, and have a reflective stripe for enhanced low-light visibility.

I have no complaints so far, but am considering putting on a set of narrower Gatorskins with smoother tread for day rides and short tours, and saving the CSTs for longer tours.

Why?  I have a preconceived and unsupported-by-data notion that the Gatorskins may be slightly lighter and offer minimally less rolling resistance, and possibly a slightly smoother ride.  The CSTs aren't bad in the smooth ride department but I do feel a slightly discernible vibration that I attribute to their tread design and pattern.  My recollection of Gatorskins is that their tread is much lower profile- almost, but not quite, a slick.

On the other hand, Gatorskins are about $100/pair so it'd be a relatively expensive route to go.  Far cheaper to simply ride the CSTs until they're done and get on with life in the meantime, choosing a replacement only when the need arises. 

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11 months ago
Kelly IniguezTo Keith Adams

Jacinto purchased a LHT in 2008. We wanted to upgrade the tires to Marathon Plus'. The shop recommended the CST Sensamo tires as equal quality for a fraction of the price. That proved to be true. The problem (?) is that the tires last so long, we forget the name. They came to our memory again in Green Valley, AZ where we were looking for an emergency tire. We've purchased CST tires several times since for him. They are indeed similar in thickness to the Marathon Plus. 

As for Gatorskins - I've been spending quite a bit of time in Tucson this winter. Gatorskins seems to be the tire of choice down there. Specifically, the Duraskin (which has a reinforced sidewall). Two of my bikes now have Gatorskins. I've had only one flat all winter in Tucson, which was from the tire liner rubbing the tube. I took that out! Thorns are a problem down there. The local recumbent store, Ajo Bikes, recommends Leo's Trio (so named for the employee who came up with the idea).  This is a flat resistant tube, a tire liner, and a Marathon Plus tire! Note that the majority of recumbents they sell are motorized trikes - weight does not matter when you have a motor. The employee telling me of the set up says that he has no concerns now, and rides right through broken glass without a care!

A side note on the Duraskins - I've become friends with a tandem couple who are training for Paris-Brest-Paris. They say the Duraskin is the popular tire in their crowd. 

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11 months ago
Keith AdamsTo Kelly Iniguez

I like Continental tires.

My upright tandem has sported Gatorskins for years.  I'm still not able to recall what I used before that and don't want to do dirt to some brand that doesn't deserve it by calling them out in error.

My road bike wears Conti Grand Prix 5000s.

My mountain bike has the Conti Town and Country model.

I've been less thrilled with their "heavy duty" 20" touring tire (Top Touring) so, although I have one hanging on the workshop wall it's more memento than spare.

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11 months ago