Construction Images - Crosswinds - CycleBlaze

Construction Images

I started working on the e-assist components in March of 2019. Being a retired Machinist-Tool/Die maker, as well as woodworking hobbyist, if there is a component I want, but that is not available off-the-shelf, I have no compunction about making it myself.

The aluminum framework is a Phoenix XL rear end that I use as a manufacturing base for the racks. The large, square tubing I got at the local hardware store. In my introduction, I did not mention that my bike is a Phoenix XL.
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I use Problem Solver clamps and components where possible to avoid having do make those parts myself. That is much faster and less expensive. Just because Problem Solvers did not intend for their water bottle mounts or down tube shifter clamps to be used for an under seat rack did not stop me for using them as such.
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The clamp on bottom bracket shell for the e-assist motor seen from the left rear perspective. It is off set far to the left to get the main chain ring as close to the frame as possible. I had these parts painted with Cerakote to keep the paint buildup to a minimum. The inside diameter of the clamp surface I made .010" larger than the painted surface of the bike frame to allow room for "hockey tape" on the inside clamp surfaces.
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Test fit up of the motor with the torque brace installed.
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One of five spacer nuts I made to offset the chain ring towards the main chain ring.
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The complete unde rseat rack prior to painting. The lower deck is installed after the upper is in place on the bike.
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Under seat upper portion in place showing the relation to the rear rack.
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The under seat rack is about two inches wider than the rear rack.
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Looking down the chain line. I eventually had to make a taller set of chain ring nuts to move the outer chain ring in closer.
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The skeleton of the battery box shell.
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The start of the skinning process of the skeleton with 1/2 mm (.020") Baltic Birch plywood.
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After completing the skinning all the way around, the protruding edges were cleaned up with a Japanese "flush cut" saw.
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With the exterior protected with wax paper and with tape "guides" on the inside, it is ready to foam.
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All foamed up with "minimum" expansion foam.
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Removing the cross bracing.
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The inside of the shell cleaned up with a hot wire and glued and doweled to the bottom plate. The foam sticks very well to the interior surface of the plywood, the stringers and the upper and lower bulkheads, beefing up the entire structure.
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The Lexan battery box and the heat sink in place. There are five 10-32 T nuts fixed into the mounting plate of the Lexan box. The stem of the T nuts protrude into the 1/4" plywood base of the shell to maintain position of the battery box to the shell and are secured with stainless fasteners. There are six T nuts glued to the plywood base plate that are used to clamp the entire assembly to the front rack. Basically, the battery box is bolted directly to the bike and the shell is along for the ride.
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The two battery packs placed in position.
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The start of the spot welding of the connector plates.
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Welded up and live! Best place to store them was the Lexan box!
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Top view of the kick stand mount. The original bolt up was the center hole, but that put the outside (upper wall) too close to the chain. So, I had to move the hole over to eliminate the chain interference.
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Not shown is a steel support strip that was attached to the upper end of the square aluminum tubing and bolted on to the upper arm. This kickstand was not originally intended for use on a loaded tour bike.
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